The iPhone bombshell and the loss of perspective

This lost-and-found iPhone story has kind of made very one associated with it a little insane.

The editors at Gizmodo have absolutely lost my respect, by paying for a “scoop”, when their legal and ethical obligation was to report the missing phone to the police. Engadget simply lost the bidding war and tried their best to capitalize. And for what?

Check out this tweet by Marco Arment. There’s not a dollar amount they can draw from this that would justify the cost, in time, effort, and lawyers, that this is likely to bring. But, driven by the “gotta be first” mentality of tech blogging, they ignored all semblance of journalistic integrity and busted out the checkbook.

Worse, when the shit hit the fan, they detailed the plight of the Apple employee, name, picture, and all, that they themselves caused, then making a disingenuous offer to return the phone.

And again I ask, for what? To steal pageviews FROM YOURSELVES on the day of the inevitable upcoming reveal. I’m sickened by the way this has been handled, but more confused as to why no one seems to have been using their brains. I can only surmise that those involved saw that rarest of beasts, the Apple prototype, and lost their shit.

And then, the New York Times found an analyst who opined that he’d “rather be anyone else in the world” than this Apple employee. Really? The world is a big place full of suffering people, and here we have a guy who has raised Steve Jobs’s ire.

I‘ve sat in a deposition room while being grilled by an Apple lawyer who was sent by an angry Steve Jobs. The lawyer twisted every email, document, and snippet into an insane, madhouse version of the facts, and even insinuated that I had gone to work for Apple as a spy. And hey, I’m still here. And I could even be an Apple employee again someday (not bloody likely, but I could).

My point is that this clumsy guy isn’t going to die of Pissed Off Steve Jobs. He may be fired, and then he’ll have the world’s best cover letter for his next job application. Let’s save some of this worrying for the people who really deserve it.

I don’t know what to do about Gizmodo, though. I would support a boycott if one were proposed, but I lack the influence to put it together myself. John Gruber, I’m looking at you.